Brexit is final — U.K. formally leaves EU 3 years after referendum

More than three and a half years after Britain voted to leave the European Union (EU), Brexit has finally happened.

At midnight Brussels time on Friday, British flags were removed from EU offices, and the EU flag was lowered on the British premises, marking the nation’s official departure from the EU and ending its 47-year membership.


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“For many people, this is an astonishing moment of hope, a moment they thought would never come,” said Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Last week, European Council President Charles Michel and Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, signed the U.K.’s withdrawal agreement.

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U.K. celebrates in London as the clock hits Brexit hour for leaving the EU

U.K. celebrates in London as the clock hits Brexit hour for leaving the EU

EU legislators overwhelmingly voted to approve the agreement on Wednesday. The EU is now bidding farewell to 15 per cent of its economy, its biggest military spender and the city of London, the world’s international financial capital.

“We will always love you and you will never be far,” von der Leyen said on Wednesday.


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“Things will inevitably change but our friendship will remain,” Michel wrote in a post on Twitter. “Look forward to writing this new page together.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the federal government is “very confident” there will minimal disruptions related to trade, investment and other ties between Canada and the U.K following Brexit.

“We have been engaged with the United Kingdom over the past few years, working on that transition plan, to make sure the very important trade numbers between Canada and the [U.K.] are not disrupted at all,” Trudeau said Friday.

French President Emmanuel Macron said that Brexit should prompt changes within the EU.

“It’s a sad day, let’s not hide it,” he said. “But it is a day that must also lead us to do things differently.”

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Boris Johnson says U.K. departure from EU is ‘new act’ for country

Boris Johnson says U.K. departure from EU is ‘new act’ for country

Britain’s departure comes almost four years after a narrow majority of Britons voted in favour of leaving the EU.

During the 2016 referendum, 17.4 million respondents — or 52 per cent — opted to leave the pact. Forty-eight per cent voted to remain.


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What followed was years of negotiations, wherein U.K. lawmakers repeatedly defeated attempts from then-prime minister Theresa May and her successor Johnson to push through the Brexit legislation.

The logjam was finally broken last month when Johnson’s Conservative Party won the Dec. 12, 2019 election and formed a majority government.

The victory allowed the party to override objections and amendments to the bill from the opposition, and lawmakers ultimately approved it on Jan. 9, 2020.

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One English town’s push to leave the European Union

One English town’s push to leave the European Union

The bill received royal assent from Queen Elizabeth II and was signed into law last week.

After the royal assent was announced, Johnson told reporters that “at times,” it felt as though the U.K. would “never cross the Brexit finish line.”

“But we’ve done it,” he said.

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Brexit: U.K. union jack flag removed from European Council

Brexit: U.K. union jack flag removed from European Council

Celebrations

The British government marked the momentous occasion on Friday with elaborate celebrations.

“January 31st is a significant moment in our history as the United Kingdom leaves the EU and regains its independence,” the government said in a statement announcing the Brexit celebrations.

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Boris Johnson discusses post-Brexit relationship with EU head

Boris Johnson discusses post-Brexit relationship with EU head

“The government intends to use this as a moment to heal divisions, reunite communities and look forward to the country that we want to build over the next decade.”

Initially, the government sought to have Big Ben ring at 11 p.m. Brussels time, however after failing to come up with the funds, the idea was abandoned.

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Brexit supporters sing ‘We Are the Champions’ before counting down to U.K. departure

Brexit supporters sing ‘We Are the Champions’ before counting down to U.K. departure

Meanwhile, Brexit Party Leader Nigel Farage held his own celebration at Parliament Square in London.

But not everyone is celebrating.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon called Brexit a moment of “profound sadness.”

After the bill received royal assent, Scottish National Party lawmaker Ian Blackford said the U.K. was experiencing a “constitutional crisis” because the legislatures in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland did not back the bill.

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‘Mr Brexit’ Nigel Farage celebrates with supporters at Leave party as U.K. departs EU

‘Mr Brexit’ Nigel Farage celebrates with supporters at Leave party as U.K. departs EU

On Wednesday, ahead of the EU vote, German Social Democratic Party member Tiemo Woelken called it an “incredible sad and painful moment.”

“We’ll wait for your return to our European family,” Woelken said.


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What happens next?

While some are celebrating, the work is far from complete. Now that the U.K. has officially left the EU, it’s back to the negotiating table.

Both the U.K. and the EU now need to decide what their future relationship will be moving forward.

This will ultimately be worked out during what is called the “implementation period,” which is expected to last until Dec. 31, 2020.


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During this time, things will stay largely the same.

For instance, the old rules for travel to and from the EU will stand, citizens will retain the right to live and work in the EU and free trade between the U.K. and the EU will continue as usual.

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U.K. lawmakers approve Brexit bill, departure planned for Jan. 31

U.K. lawmakers approve Brexit bill, departure planned for Jan. 31

What’s more, while in the transitional period, the European Court of Justice will still be responsible for settling legal disputes.

However, the U.K. has now forfeited membership to the union’s institutions, including the European Parliament and the European Commission, and has lost its voting rights.

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Brexit: U.K. officially leaves EU, not much to change for at least 11 months

Brexit: U.K. officially leaves EU, not much to change for at least 11 months

At the top of the list once negotiations start will be establishing a new free trade agreement.

Britain has expressed its desire to end the transitional period as soon as possible and would like to come to a full trade deal within the next 11 months.

The EU, though, has said such a time span is far too short to develop a comprehensive deal.


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Other items, including security, data sharing and rules for travel, will also need to be ironed out during this time.

Johnson has given few clues about what the future holds, promising only to restore confidence for people and businesses.

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The road ahead for Brexit in 2020

The road ahead for Brexit in 2020

“We’ll be out of the EU, free to chart our own course as a sovereign nation,” he said.

— With files from the Associated Press and Reuters


(C) 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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